St. Cecilia Parish
Boston, MA

Dedicated in 1894, St Cecilia's Parish had not received any restoration work since 1954. The primary mission behind this project was to restore the building fabric and make the various ministries housed at the Parish more visible, accessible, and inviting. The exterior masonry, roof, and stained glass windows were cleaned and restored. The interior of the upper church was also restored to its original colorful appearance. The lower church was gutted and converted into a Parish Center with classrooms, a coffee bar, and a large social bar. A four story building that blocked light into the Nave was removed and replaced with a glass stairway and elevator. In addition, a glassy, transparent entrance building was designed to allow daylight to illuminate the stained glass windows on the east side of the Nave, brightening the interior and offering a view through the building to the newly created gardens. 

Scope
Schematic Design & Design Development
Construction Documents & Administration
Historic Preservation

Size
16,000 sq. ft.

Status
Completed in 2010

Awards
2016 Faith and Form Award
2012 Preservation Award, Sponsored by the Massachusetts Historical Comission


Photos by Bruce T. Martin
 

 

Cathedral Church of St. Paul
Boston, MA

Donham & Sweeney designed extensive renovations to this National Landmark building, the seat of Episcopal Diocese in Massachusetts. The refreshed church is more responsive to the shifting ministry needs of this urban congregation situated across from Boston Common. Renovations include an enhanced, more welcoming entry, the liturgical reworking of the main worship space, the insertion of a small chapel, and the total renovation of the lower level to better house a full range of ministries. A new, transparent elevator provides access to all levels.

Scope
Master Plan
Schematic Design through
Construction Administration
Historic Preservation

Size
9,965 sq. ft.

Status
Completed in 2015

                                                                                                                                                               Photos: Bruce T. Martin

 

Andover Newton Theological School
Wilson Chapel | Newton, MA

The design of the Wilson Chapel at the Andover Newton Theological School grew from the need to facilitate the making of community, to assist in the formation of spiritual beings. The building is rooted in the long tradition of the New England meeting house - a space where worship, cultural events and civic decision-making occurred, organically fostering a sense of fellowship. Described by the Boston Globe as “a superb building… among the small gems of recent New England architecture”, the new Chapel created an opportunity to reinvent the meeting house, to craft a simple form and fill it with life.

Scope
Schematic Design & Design Development
Construction Documents & Administration

Status
Completed in 2007

Awards
Religious Art & Architecture Design Award Sponsored by Faith and Form magazine and the Interfaith Forum on Religion, Art, & Architecture

Photos by Richard Mandelkorn
 

 

First Parish Congregational Church
Saco, ME

This early Context project, undertaken as Donham & Sweeney, involved the design a replacement facility for this historic 1860's church after it burnt to the ground in August of 2000. The new design includes a curved sanctuary filled with light that seats 450 people, a balcony, a spacious two-story atrium, and a large fellowship hall. All spaces - for worship, musical and performance, fellowship, educational, and administrative - have been designed to support the congregation in embracing a church of the 21st century, whilst remembering the gracious building that had stood at the Saco crossroads for the greater part of 140 years.

Scope
Schematic Design & Design Development
Construction Documents & Administration

Size
32,000 sq. ft.

Status
Completed in 2004

Photos by Bruce T. Martin
 

 

Christ Congregational Church
Brockton, MA

This building needs no sign to identify its use. It grows out of the distinguished tradition of New England Congregational churches. It is honest and straightforward, not grand or pretentious. It is filled with light. It is, like the congregation services, “worship-centered”. Worship is a collective activity, so the design focused on the 400-seat sanctuary where there is a strong sense of unity and where the participants in worship can see and experience one another.

A square room, symmetrical on all sides, had the best sense of "oneness"; turning the room 45 degrees gave it a distinctive quality and allowed for an open integration of the supporting spaces - the chapel, the chancel, the organ/choir space, and the narthex. The building also includes a library, fellowship hall, kitchen, classrooms, and offices.

Scope
Schematic Design & Design Development
Construction Documents & Administration

Status
Completed in 2000

Photos by Steve Rosenthal
 

 

St. Paul's Church
Brookline, MA

Designed in 1851 by Richard Upjohn in the English Country Gothic style, this landmark church was destroyed by a devastating fire. Its renewal created the opportunity to not only restore the building’s exterior but also redesign the interior for greater flexibility. The result is a dramatic open plan which serves as a multi-purpose space; while the main use is for worship services, other uses include concerts, lectures, and plays. A major feature of the new church is an active solar heating system which provides more than 80 percent of the building's heating needs. The exterior of the building closely follows the lines of the old church, except for the addition of two light scoops high on the roof.

Scope
Schematic Design & Design Development
Construction Documents & Administration

Status
Completed in 2000

Photos by Hutchens Photography